Pollution and Fertility

Intervention: #10 Exposure to Pollutants
 
Fact Check

  • Minimize exposure to pollutants.
Pollutants act through several mechanisms that can affect numerous physiological functions, including reproduction: as endocrine disruptors or reactive oxygen species inducers, and through the formation of DNA adducts and/or epigenetic modifications.

Air pollutants cause defects during gametogenesis leading to a drop in reproductive capacities in exposed populations.

Increased concentrations of ambient particulate matter (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO) during controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and after embryo transfer were associated with a decreased probability of intrauterine pregnancy.

Air pollutants cause defects during gametogenesis leading to a drop in reproductive capacities in exposed populations.

Increased concentrations of ambient particulate matter (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO) during controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and after embryo transfer were associated with a decreased probability of intrauterine pregnancy.

We found that in the IVF population, nitrogen dioxide and ozone were associated with a reduced live birth rate while particulate matter of 10 mm was associated with increased miscarriage. In the general population, particulate matter of 2.5 mm and between 2.5 and 10 mm were associated with reduced fecundability, whereas sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide might promote miscarriage and stillbirths.

We found a statistically significant reduction of fertility rates with an increase in traffic related air pollution levels, particularly for the coarse fraction of particulate matter.