Caffeine

Intervention: #12 Caffeine Intake
 
Fact Check

  • It's not clear whether caffeine affects the chance of pregnancy.
  • Some studies have found that women who drink large amounts of caffeine may take longer to become pregnant.
  • Experts advise limiting caffeine if you're trying to conceive and during pregnancy (fewer than 2 cups per day).
Caffeine is one of the most psychoactive components.

It is found in more than 60 plants.

After entering the body, it is easily distributed and exists in the saliva, breast milk, embryo, and neonate as it passes membranes, including the placenta.

It is present in coffee, tea, chocolate, cocoa products, soft and energy drinks.

Amount of caffeine in some foods and beverages

It's not clear whether caffeine affects the chance of pregnancy.

Some studies have found that women who drink large amounts of caffeine may take longer to become pregnant.

Female Fertility

Caffeine may decrease prolactin levels and may inhibit ovulation.

There is a positive correlation between caffeine and sex hormone-binding globulin.

We found that higher intake of caffeine was associated with higher risk of spontaneous abortion.

There is an inverse correlation between caffeine and oestradiol in pregnant woman.


Male Fertility

Semen parameters do not seem affected by caffeine intake from coffee, tea and cocoa drinks.

Negative effect of cola-containing beverages and caffeine-containing soft drinks on semen volume, count and concentration.

As regards sperm DNA defects, caffeine intake seemed associated with aneuploidy and DNA breaks, but not with other markers of DNA damage.

Male coffee drinking was associated to prolonged time to pregnancy in some, but not all, studies.


How Much Caffeine?

Intake levels <200–300 mg/day, appears to have no serious effects on reproduction.

The recommended amount for people trying to conceive is 100–200 mg/day, which is defined as mild consumption and equivalent to fewer than two cups of coffee per day.